• Atlas Histology

    This thirteenth edition of Atlas of Histology with Functional Correlations (formerly diFiore’s) provides a rich understanding of the basic histology concepts that medical and allied health students need to know. Realistic, full-color illustrations as well as actual photomicrographs of histologic structures are complemented by concise discussions of their most important functional correlations. Illustrated histology images show the idealized view, while photomicrographs provide the actual view to help students hone their skills in identifying structures.New and improved layout helps students connect the morphology of a structure with its function. Updated and expandedFunctional Correlations boxes integrated throughout chapters reflect new scientific information and interpretations.NEW photomicrographs and electron micrographs provide views of microanatomy as experienced in practice.Bulleted Chapter Summaries distill the most essential knowledge for rapid review.NEW Additional Histologic Images sections round out each chapter with supplemental photomicrographs and electron micrographs.NEW Chapter Review Questions allow students to assess their comprehension of each chapter with 375 questions and answers in the book and 250 more online in an Interactive Question Bank.

    Atlas Histology

    317.00
  • Africa Writes Back: The African Writers Series & the Launch of African Literature

    June 17, 2008, is the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart by Heinemann. This publication provided the impetus for the foundation of the African Writers Series in 1962 with Chinua Achebe as the editorial adviser. This narrative, drawing liberally on the correspondence with the authors, concentrates on the adventurous first twenty-five years.

    Africa Writes Back: The African Writer’s Series & the Launch of African Literature captures the energy of literary publishing in a new and undefined field. Portraits of the leading characters and the many consultants and readers providing reports and advice to new and established writers make Africa Writes Back a stand-out book. James Currey’s voice and insights are an added bonus.

  • The Betrayal of Africa

    In the wealthy West, it’s assumed that Africa is the problem and we are the solution. This timely book argues the opposite. Though couched in benevolent terms, Western policies in fact have for decades helped fuel the continent’s devastating decline. Every year, far more of Africa’s riches flow out to the rich world than we plough into Africa. In this systematic process of exploitation, explains author Gerald Caplan, first-world leaders work in happy harmony with African despots to wreak havoc on their nations and peoples.
    The Betrayal of Africa explains its historical background, the contemporary situation, and how a conflation of elements — China’s bold new presence in Africa, an active and angry civil society demanding government reform, and fresh leadership — is creating the possibility for positive change. Using simple, lucid language, the book helps Western readers understand what they can do to remedy a complex, increasingly dire situation that affects us all.
  • Living History

    A surprisingly engaging and, at points, even compelling book…Clinton provides enough of a peek behind the curtain to keep the pages turning and presents intriguing new details on her role in shaping the policies of her husband’s presidency.

    Hillary Rodham Clinton is known to hundreds of millions of people around the world. Yet few beyond her close friends and family have ever heard her account of her extraordinary journey. She writes with candor, humor and passion about her upbringing in suburban, middle-class America in the 1950s and her transformation from Goldwater Girl to student activist to controversial First Lady. Living History is her revealing memoir of life through the White House years. It is also her chronicle of living history with Bill Clinton, a thirty-year adventure in love and politics that survives personal betrayal, relentless partisan investigations and constant public scrutiny.

    Hillary Rodham Clinton came of age during a time of tumultuous social and political change in America. Like many women of her generation, she grew up with choices and opportunities unknown to her mother or grandmother. She charted her own course through unexplored terrain — responding to the changing times and her own internal compass — and became an emblem for some and a lightning rod for others. Wife, mother, lawyer, advocate and international icon, she has lived through America’s great political wars, from Watergate to Whitewater.

    The only First Lady to play a major role in shaping domestic legislation, Hillary Rodham Clinton traveled tirelessly around the country to champion health care, expand economic and educational opportunity and promote the needs of children and families, and she crisscrossed the globe on behalf of women’s rights, human rights and democracy. She redefined the position of First Lady and helped save the presidency from an unconstitutional, politically motivated impeachment. Intimate, powerful and inspiring, Living History captures the essence of one of the most remarkable women of our time and the challenging process by which she came to define herself and find her own voice — as a woman and as a formidable figure in American politics.

    Living History

    80.00
  • Women’s Liberation and the African Freedom Struggle

    The women and men of our society are all victims of imperialist oppression and domination. That is why they wage the same battle. The revolution and women’s liberation go together. We do not talk of women’s emancipation as an act of charity or out of a surge of human compassion. It is a basic necessity for the revolution to triump. ~ Thomas Sankara

    Thomas Sankara, leader of the 1983-87 revolution in Burkina Faso in West Africa, not only spoke to the challenges confronting women’s struggle for liberation in that continent. Convinced of the need for a Marxist understanding of human society, he explains here the origins of women’s oppression and puts forward a political course in the struggle to eradicate it.

  • Thomas Sankara Speaks: The Burkina Faso Revolution 1983-1987

    Under Sankara’s leadership, the revolutionary government of Burkina Faso in West Africa set an electrifying example. Peasants, workers, women, and youth mobilized to carry out literacy and immunization drives; to sink wells, plant trees, build dams, erect housing; to combat the oppression of women and transform exploitative relations on the land; to free themselves from the imperialist yoke and solidarize with others engaged in that fight internationally.

    Second edition includes a preface by Mary-Alice Waters, a new introduction by editor Michel Prairie, maps, chronology, glossary, and index. Two extensive photo sections feature many unpublished photos of the Burkina Faso revolution.

  • From Third World to First: Singapore and the Asian Economic Boom

    Few gave tiny Singapore much chance of survival when it was granted independence in 1965. How is it, then, that today the former British colonial trading post is a thriving Asian metropolis with not only the world’s number one airline, best airport, and busiest port of trade, but also the world’s fourth–highest per capita real income?

    The story of that transformation is told here by Singapore’s charismatic, controversial founding father, Lee Kuan Yew. Rising from a legacy of divisive colonialism, the devastation of the Second World War, and general poverty and disorder following the withdrawal of foreign forces, Singapore now is hailed as a city of the future. This miraculous history is dramatically recounted by the man who not only lived through it all but who fearlessly forged ahead and brought about most of these changes.

    Delving deep into his own meticulous notes, as well as previously unpublished government papers and official records, Lee details the extraordinary efforts it took for an island city–state in Southeast Asia to survive at that time.

    Lee explains how he and his cabinet colleagues finished off the communist threat to the fledgling state’s security and began the arduous process of nation building: forging basic infrastructural roads through a land that still consisted primarily of swamps, creating an army from a hitherto racially and ideologically divided population, stamping out the last vestiges of colonial–era corruption, providing mass public housing, and establishing a national airline and airport.

    In this illuminating account, Lee writes frankly about his trenchant approach to political opponents and his often unorthodox views on human rights, democracy, and inherited intelligence, aiming always “to be correct, not politically correct.” Nothing in Singapore escaped his watchful eye: whether choosing shrubs for the greening of the country, restoring the romance of the historic Raffles Hotel, or openly, unabashedly persuading young men to marry women as well educated as themselves. Today’s safe, tidy Singapore bears Lee’s unmistakable stamp, for which he is unapologetic: “If this is a nanny state, I am proud to have fostered one.”

    Though Lee’s domestic canvas in Singapore was small, his vigor and talent assured him a larger place in world affairs. With inimitable style, he brings history to life with cogent analyses of some of the greatest strategic issues of recent times and reveals how, over the years, he navigated the shifting tides of relations among America, China, and Taiwan, acting as confidant, sounding board, and messenger for them. He also includes candid, sometimes acerbic pen portraits of his political peers, including the indomitable Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, the poetry–spouting Jiang Zemin, and ideologues George Bush and Deng Xiaoping.

    Lee also lifts the veil on his family life and writes tenderly of his wife and stalwart partner, Kwa Geok Choo, and of their pride in their three children –– particularly the eldest son, Hsien Loong, who is now Singapore’s deputy prime minister.

    For more than three decades, Lee Kuan Yew has been praised and vilified in equal measure, and he has established himself as a force impossible to ignore in Asian and international politics. From Third World to First offers readers a compelling glimpse into this visionary’s heart, soul, and mind.

  • There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra

    From the legendary author of Things Fall Apart comes this long-awaited memoir recalling Chinua Achebe’s personal experiences of and reflections on the Biafran War, one of Nigeria’s most tragic civil wars.

    Chinua Achebe, the author of Things Fall Apart, was a writer whose moral courage and storytelling gifts have left an enduring stamp on world literature. There Was a Country was his long-awaited account of coming of age during the defining experience of his life: the Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War of 1967-1970. It became infamous around the world for its impact on the Biafrans, who were starved to death by the Nigerian government in one of the twentieth century’s greatest humanitarian disasters.

    Caught up in the atrocities were Chinua Achebe and his young family. Achebe, already a world-renowned novelist, served his Biafran homeland as a roving cultural ambassador, witnessing the war’s full horror first-hand. Immediately after the war, he took an academic post in the United States, and for over forty years he maintained a considered silence on those terrible years, addressing them only obliquely through his poetry. After years in the making, There Was a Country presents his towering reckoning with one of modern Africa’s most fateful experiences, both as he lived it and came to understand it.

    Marrying history and memoir, with the author’s poetry woven throughout, There Was a Country is a distillation of vivid observation and considered research and reflection. It relates Nigeria’s birth pangs in the context of Achebe’s own development as a man and a writer, and examines the role of the artist in times of war.

    Reviews:

    ‘No writer is better placed than Chinua Achebe to tell the story of the Nigerian Biafran war … [The book] makes you pine for the likes of Achebe to govern … We have in There Was a Country an elegy from a master storyteller who has witnessed the undulating fortunes of a nation.’ Noo Saro-Wiwa, Guardian

    ‘Chinua Achebe’s history of Biafra is a meditation on the condition of freedom. It has the tense narrative grip of the best fiction. It is also a revelatory entry into the intimate character of the writer’s brilliant mind and bold spirit. Achebe has created here a new genre of literature.’ Nadine Gordimer

    ‘Part-history, part-memoir, [Achebe’s] moving account of the war is laced with anger, but there is also an abiding tone of regret for what Nigeria might have been without conflict and mismanagement.’ Sunday Times

  • My First Coup d’Etat: Memories from the Lost Decades of Africa

    My First Coup D'Etat chronicles the coming-of-age of John Dramani Mahama (former President of Ghana) in Ghana during the dismal post-independence 'lost decades' of Africa. He was seven years old when rumours of a coup reached his boarding school in Accra. His father, a minister of state, was suddenly missing, then imprisoned for more than a year.

    My First Coup D'Etat offers a look at the country that has long been considered Africa's success story. This is a one-of-a-kind book: Mahama's is a rare literary voice from a political leader, and his stories work on many levels – as fables, as history, as cultural and political analysis, and, of course, as the memoir of a young man who, unbeknownst to him or anyone else, would grow up to be vice president of his nation. Though non-fiction, these are stories that rise above their specific settings and transport the reader – much like the fiction of Isaac Bashevis Singer and Nadine Gordimer – into a world all their own, one which straddles a time lost and explores the universal human emotions of love, fear, faith, despair, loss, longing, and hope despite all else.

    An important literary debut from the then Vice President of Ghana, a fable-like memoir that offers a shimmering microcosm of post-colonial Africa.

    'A much welcome work of immense relevance.' ~ Chinua Achebe

  • Because of Kwadua

    An autobiography in honour of love, Because of Kwadua, is an easy read of love in the colonial and immediate independent Ghana from the late 40s to the late 60s.

    Set in the capital city of the country, Accra, and the Golden city, Kumasi, and their environs, the author, Hans Rudolf Roth recounts the stoic love of Kwadua, his wife, as he forays into work, experiences and making a living in Ghana at the time as a white.

    Because of Kwadua unfolds a magnificent gallery of memorable character, vivid snapshots of political rivalry, supervised and shrewd corporate efforts at profit making, the spell and blessing of domestic love and the nobility of traditional royal life.

    Transplanted from Europe to the Swiss African Trading firm in Kumasi, young Roth finds himself ensnared by the 'dainty lady from Africa', 'the black beauty of the Gold Coast'. The hidden beauty, the excellent cooking and the charming manners of Mercy Kwadua Kwafo deepen the undying intimacy of the two till their love ripens into inescapable wedlock.

    The book is set in the turbulent last days of colonial administration in the Gold Coast and five decades of post-independence Ghana and moves with astonishing kaleidoscopic speed.

    Because of Kwadua unfolds a magnificient gallery of memorable characters, vivid snapshots of political party rivalry, supervised and shrewd corporate efforts at profit making, the spell and blessing of domestic love and the nobility of traditional royal life.

    Very exiting, very entertaining and full of drama, the book holds the reader with magnetic compulsion.

  • Grandma Goody’s Story: From Gold Coast to Ghana

    Introduce your children to the Ghana story again in this beautifully-narrated tale with pictures, published to celebrate Ghana’s 60th independence anniversary. Allow yourself and your children to travel through time…

    Grandma Goody’s Story: From Gold Coast to Ghana. A book in which Grandma Goody makes Ghana’s history alive to children with witty stories of her experiences and many captivating photos.

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